How To Lower Your A1c Level?

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If you already have diabetes and are taking medications that can cause low blood sugar levels, find out your optimal levels. in people at risk for hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), for example, it may not be safe to keep their a1c level below 7 percent. the medications that lower fasting blood sugars will also lower your a1c level.. For example, if your doctor tells you that your a1c level is 10.0%, the 10% is 5 percentage points above 5% which you know corresponds to 97 mg/dl. you can then multiply 5 by 28 to get 140 and 5 by 29 to get 145, a range of 140-145 mg/dl above 97 mg/dl. thus your average blood sugar for the past three months is 237-242 mg/dl..

Reach out to your specific grocery store to see if they have a dietitian to help. also remember that fruits, veggies, and lean-protein can also help lower your a1c. exercise. 150 minutes or more of moderate-to-intense physical activity over 3 days per week can help lower your a1c! lose weight. check your blood sugar as directed..

5 Ways to Lower Your A1C levels

To lower a1c levels, increase your consumption of veggies, fruits, beans, nuts, and fish and reduce your intake of high-fat, high-cholesterol foods. drink plenty of water to stay hydrated, and try to perform at least 30 minutes of physical activity every day.. Walking, playing sports, bike riding, or swimming are some simple and enjoyable activities that will get you moving an help to keep your blood sugar under control, and thus lower your a1c score. stay on track with your blood sugar. ask your doctor if checking your blood sugar levels is a good idea. if so, find out how often you should be checking them..

Walking, playing sports, bike riding, or swimming are some simple and enjoyable activities that will get you moving an help to keep your blood sugar under control, and thus lower your a1c score. stay on track with your blood sugar. ask your doctor if checking your blood sugar levels is a good idea. if so, find out how often you should be checking them.. For example, if your doctor tells you that your a1c level is 10.0%, the 10% is 5 percentage points above 5% which you know corresponds to 97 mg/dl. you can then multiply 5 by 28 to get 140 and 5 by 29 to get 145, a range of 140-145 mg/dl above 97 mg/dl. thus your average blood sugar for the past three months is 237-242 mg/dl..